Shown here is one of Master Smith Ohara Yasuhiko's handmade tatara, the traditional Japanese furnace used to smelt the tamahagane steel that each of our kanna is furnished from
       
     
SDIM0034.JPG
       
     
SDIM0039.JPG
       
     
 There is no iron ore in Japan, making the  satetsu  (iron sand) found in its rivers the lone source of materials for smelting
       
     
SDIM0064.JPG
       
     
SDIM0066.JPG
       
     
 This sand is gathered through the use of magnets, and then smelted inside the clay  tatara  that Ohara builds
       
     
SDIM0061.JPG
       
     
SDIM0041.JPG
       
     
SDIM0051.JPG
       
     
SDIM0025.JPG
       
     
SDIM0070.JPG
       
     
 A few  tatara  are still in use today in Japan (e.g.  Shimane Prefecture ) but Ohara is unique in his determination to build them by hand, often for one-time only use
       
     
SDIM0089.JPG
       
     
SDIM0094.JPG
       
     
SDIM0099.JPG
       
     
 A few branches of the  sakaki  tree are ceremonially burned and a   shimenawa   is tied around the body of the  tatara  to demonstrate the reverence felt for this traditional technique
       
     
SDIM0225.JPG
       
     
SDIM0227.JPG
       
     
 After this ceremony the smelting process begins
       
     
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SDIM0234.JPG
       
     
SDIM0235.JPG
       
     
SDIM0240.JPG
       
     
SDIM0247.JPG
       
     
 Back in his workshop, Ohara welds this newly smelted steel into the  kanna  we use everyday in making our furniture
       
     
SDIM0408.JPG
       
     
SDIM0412.JPG
       
     
 In this way, Ohara's work not only produces world class woodworking tools, but also keeps the traditional culture of Japan alive in the modern world
       
     
IMG_6644.JPG
       
     
 Shown here is one of Master Smith Ohara Yasuhiko's handmade tatara, the traditional Japanese furnace used to smelt the tamahagane steel that each of our kanna is furnished from
       
     

Shown here is one of Master Smith Ohara Yasuhiko's handmade tatara, the traditional Japanese furnace used to smelt the tamahagane steel that each of our kanna is furnished from

SDIM0034.JPG
       
     
SDIM0039.JPG
       
     
 There is no iron ore in Japan, making the  satetsu  (iron sand) found in its rivers the lone source of materials for smelting
       
     

There is no iron ore in Japan, making the satetsu (iron sand) found in its rivers the lone source of materials for smelting

SDIM0064.JPG
       
     
SDIM0066.JPG
       
     
 This sand is gathered through the use of magnets, and then smelted inside the clay  tatara  that Ohara builds
       
     

This sand is gathered through the use of magnets, and then smelted inside the clay tatara that Ohara builds

SDIM0061.JPG
       
     
SDIM0041.JPG
       
     
SDIM0051.JPG
       
     
SDIM0025.JPG
       
     
SDIM0070.JPG
       
     
 A few  tatara  are still in use today in Japan (e.g.  Shimane Prefecture ) but Ohara is unique in his determination to build them by hand, often for one-time only use
       
     

A few tatara are still in use today in Japan (e.g. Shimane Prefecture) but Ohara is unique in his determination to build them by hand, often for one-time only use

SDIM0089.JPG
       
     
SDIM0094.JPG
       
     
SDIM0099.JPG
       
     
 A few branches of the  sakaki  tree are ceremonially burned and a   shimenawa   is tied around the body of the  tatara  to demonstrate the reverence felt for this traditional technique
       
     

A few branches of the sakaki tree are ceremonially burned and a shimenawa is tied around the body of the tatara to demonstrate the reverence felt for this traditional technique

SDIM0225.JPG
       
     
SDIM0227.JPG
       
     
 After this ceremony the smelting process begins
       
     

After this ceremony the smelting process begins

SDIM0230.JPG
       
     
SDIM0234.JPG
       
     
SDIM0235.JPG
       
     
SDIM0240.JPG
       
     
SDIM0247.JPG
       
     
 Back in his workshop, Ohara welds this newly smelted steel into the  kanna  we use everyday in making our furniture
       
     

Back in his workshop, Ohara welds this newly smelted steel into the kanna we use everyday in making our furniture

SDIM0408.JPG
       
     
SDIM0412.JPG
       
     
 In this way, Ohara's work not only produces world class woodworking tools, but also keeps the traditional culture of Japan alive in the modern world
       
     

In this way, Ohara's work not only produces world class woodworking tools, but also keeps the traditional culture of Japan alive in the modern world

IMG_6644.JPG